Exercise And Injuries, What Should I Do Now?

At-Home Exercise Helps After Hip Break: study

Remember the key to any great exercise routine is consistency and at times variation in ones routine. The writer has never seen success with people that only workout a couple days a week. Also it helps to keep mind the amount of calories you may be consuming, especially if your workout routine has been altered. A person could easily gain some weight back that they have lost if they are not burning off as many calories because of an injury. Let face it, a person that is hurting physically from a workout injury almost always seeks comfort foods such as cookies, cakes and other high calorie fast foods and that can be a calorie trap that has to be avoided.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.examiner.com/article/exercise-and-injuries-what-should-i-do-now

Dr. Mehmet Oz

Two years after experiencing a hip fracture, more than 80 percent of patients who could previously walk without assistance and climb stairs are unable to resume these activities, Latham said. This immobility, combined with fear of falling, prevents them from doing any activities often leading to a downward spiral in function and quality of life. For their study, Latham http://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/p90x3-reviews/sbwire-455028.htm and her team worked with 195 functionally-limited older adults who had completed traditional rehabilitation after a hip fracture. Half of the group received cardiovascular nutrition education, while the intervention group received instruction for home rehabilitation including three to four home visits with a physical therapist, training for p90X3 exercises and goal-setting tools.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/02/19/hip-fracture-patients-may-regain-mobility-faster-with-at-home-exercise/

Hip fracture patients may regain mobility faster with at-home exercise

However, research has also shown that months of intensive outpatient physical therapy improves function, mobility and other outcomes, she added. “It’s good to know that works, but that’s not going to be realistic,” she said. To test a more realistic home-based program for helping seniors regain mobility and function, the researchers recruited 232 people aged 60 years old and older from the Boston area. All had experienced a hip fracture and had been released from a physical rehabilitation program within the past 20 months.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/02/20/us-at-home-exercise-study-idUSBREA1J1YM20140220

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